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Jameela Jamil says lockdown has made her 'less ignorant'
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Jameela Jamil says lockdown has made her 'less ignorant'

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Jameela Jamil says lockdown has made her 'less ignorant'

Jameela Jamil thinks the coronavirus lockdown has helped her to become a "less ignorant person".

The 34-year-old actress has spent lockdown in Los Angeles with her boyfriend James Blake, and she's used the time at home to "investigate, learn, read and educate" herself on various issues.

She shared: "For the last couple of years, I've been so busy I haven't had time to learn and I think that contributed to a lot of the mistakes I've made.

"This has given me space to really investigate, learn, read and educate myself.

"I was so busy [before], I didn't have time to really know what I was talking about all the time and I feel very grateful for this pause in being able to, hopefully, become a less problematic, less ignorant person."

The outspoken star thinks the lockdown experience has changed her for the better.

Jameela also believes she's found new, better ways of expressing her ideas.

The presenter-turned-actress - who stars in the comedy series 'The Good Place' - told Grazia magazine: "I think I'll come out of this a more calm, thoughtful and careful person, more aware of the damage of having a 280-character Twitter word count.

"Now I have the podcast and YouTube channel I don't have to compact all of my thoughts and that's amazing.

"Now I have time and space for nuance and context, because without that I got f***ed on Twitter.

"It's understandable for the public to not trust powerful people, so I've always known that everyone has always read the most evil possible intention into my every move, they always think I'm manipulative or I have an ulterior motive.

"No one can believe that I would genuinely just want to try and help."

Jameela also thinks the pandemic has caused people's values to shift.

She explained: "I think our value system is changing, the things we used to idolize seem insignificant now.

"When the world went into a global emergency, the people who became the heroes and icons on the covers of magazines were the essential workers.

"I think we've had a wake-up call about who matters and who doesn't. Our value system has shifted."

This article originally ran on celebretainment.com.

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