Try 1 month for 99¢

We’re not shy about using this space to criticize government bodies or officials when we believe they’re falling short of their duties to the people they serve. We also like to use the same space to commend a job done well, or a decision that improves the quality of life in a community. Catch them doing something right, as the management-training slogan goes.

Today, we’re commending the Burlington City Council.

Earlier this month the City Council voted 6-1 to approve an agreement to not charge the Burlington Senior Center rent for 2019. The center relocated to its new space at the former Knights of Columbus Hall, 587 E. State St., in January.

“I was very, very pleased because, to be honest, to have that many members vote to not charge rent,” Senior Center Administrator Gail Boydstun said. “This allows me to relax, so to speak, and be able to concentrate on what I need to do for the seniors here as far as the classes and the events.”

Boydstun told The Journal Times that she reported to the council that in November alone, 497 seniors had visited the center, as well as an additional 246 non-seniors, who mostly attended private events held in the center’s main hall.

Those people came from as far away as East Troy, Elkhorn, Lake Geneva, Delavan, Williams Bay, Twin Lakes, Wilmot and of course Burlington’s neighbors to the north and northeast, Rochester, Waterford and Wind Lake.

Members of the Burlington community have pitched in to revitalize the new space this year. Burlington Glass, 35518 W. State St., donated glass for new windows and Ketter’s Flooring, 257 Milwaukee Ave., donated new flooring that was installed in the main activity room a few weeks ago. Thrivent Financial, 400 N. Pine St., also donated landscaping materials, which have been put to use by dedicated volunteers.

The importance of a senior center to the physical and mental health of a community’s seniors is not to be underestimated.

Forty-six percent of women age 75 and older live alone, according to 2014 data from the Administration on Aging in the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. Thirty-five percent of women older than 65 were widows in the same study. By the time people reach age 85, fully 40 percent live by themselves, according to a research paper from the Council on Contemporary Families.

Social isolation and loneliness are associated with increased mortality in older adults. Social isolation also has been linked to other adverse health effects, including dementia, increased risk for hospital readmission and increased risk of falls. But, the Association of Health Care Journalists reports, research consistently shows that feeling connected and involved benefits both mental and physical health.

Burlington’s City Council, and several local businesses, have taken action to make sure seniors in the Chocolate City area have a place to come together and enjoy the company of their peers.

Aldermen and madam mayor, you did something right, and we’re pleased to call you out on it.

Social isolation and loneliness are associated with increased mortality in older adults. Social isolation also has been linked to other adverse health effects, including dementia, increased risk for hospital readmission and increased risk of falls. But, the Association of Health Care Journalists reports, research consistently shows that feeling connected and involved benefits both mental and physical health.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0

Load comments