You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Leinenkugel's to retire logo featuring Native American woman

Leinenkugel's to retire logo featuring Native American woman

  • Updated
  • 1
{{featured_button_text}}
Leinenkugel's

Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing — based in Chippewa Falls but tied into Miller Brewing and its corporate parent MillerCoors — is retiring the Native American woman logo long associated with its brand.

CHIPPEWA FALLS — Leinenkugel’s will no longer use an image of a Native American woman long associated with the Chippewa Falls-based brewery.

The Post-Cresent reports Leinenkugel’s will begin to make changes to the logo and other imagery related to the brand in the coming months.

Company President Dick Leinenkugel said in a statement the brewery has been working to update the “look and feel” of the brand and ultimately decided to retire the image of the Native American woman.

The company’s website said it has used Native American imagery on its label since the 1930s.

The Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing Co., was founded in 1867 by Jacob Leinenkugel and acquired by Miller Brewing Co. in 1988.

The move is the latest by companies to replace dated and racially insensitive advertising logos and characters as part of a cultural moment that took hold in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death while in Minneapolis Police custody and the ensuing Black Lives Matter demonstrations.

Over the last few months, public spaces have lost statues, buildings have been stripped of names, and now consumer products are having a day of reckoning amid a nationwide reconsideration of once popularly accepted precepts.

Land O’Lakes has removed the image of a Native American woman from its butter products, and images of Black men and women on product lines such as Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben’s and Mrs. Butterworth’s are in for a makeover, if they survive at all. The Eskimo Pie name also is being replaced.

“Long gone are the days when the communication between brands and consumers was one way,” said Maria Rodas, a professor of marketing at the University of Southern California. “Consumers have more power than ever, given the huge amount of information at their fingertips, how connected they all are and the easy access to social media platforms that help broadcast their messages.”

0
0
0
0
0

Get Government & Politics updates in your inbox!

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News