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Do young ladies who have reached age 18 have to register for the draft as the young men must do? If not, why?

Though women now make up about 14 percent of American active duty personnel, the draft law only mentions men. That law withstood a 1981 challenge in the U.S. Supreme Court, according to a fact sheet from the Selective Service System.

President Bill Clinton asked the Department of Defense in 1994 to see if the policy still fit.

"Because women are excluded by policy from front line combat positions," the fact sheet explains that defense officials decided "excluding them from the draft process remains justifiable."

The idea of registering women is still tossed around occasionally as they become more entrenched in the armed forces. So far, Congress hasn't touched the law.

Though support for reinstating the draft has waned considerably in the past 30 years, people seem more receptive to gender equity. Various polls in recent years have indicated a little less than half of the population thinks women should be involved if the draft ever returns.

Some hard-boiled eggs get a dark green tint around the yolk where it meets the white, and I find these the most flavorful. What causes that tint?

I recommend ham with those green eggs, although a wise doctor once wrote that the combo is an acquired taste.

"It's a chemical reaction between iron in the yolk and sulfur (or sulfur containing protein) in the white," Barb Ingham, a food safety specialist at the University of Wisconsin-Extension, wrote in an e-mail reply. "The reaction is more likely to happen if the eggs are cooked at a high temperature and/or overcooked."

Experts suggest cooling them quickly to help fend off that color ring. Not that the reader wants it to go.

"It is still safe to eat," Ingham wrote. "It just doesn't look very nice."

So you can eat them in a house. And you can eat them with a mouse.

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All of a sudden, Channel 6 has a new announcer named Mary Stoker Smith. She's excellent, but what happened to Beverly Taylor?

Taylor is still with the station. She co-anchors Saturday newscasts at 9 and 10 p.m. and serves as a general assignment reporter during the week, according to WITI News Director Jim Lemon.

Stoker Smith is a La Crosse native who most recently worked in Philadelphia. Lemon said her main duties are to co-anchor the 5 and 6 p.m. weekday news, but she also fills in on other shows behind the desk or as a reporter.

Mike Moore compiles the Glad You Asked column. To submit a question of local interest, call (262) 631-1758 or e-mail:

 

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