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School Notes

RACINE — The Sentinel Mentors are hoping to encourage a whole bus-load of Racine students to take part in a tour of historically black colleges and universities this spring.

The tour is run by the non-profit Education Youth Development Outreach, and co-founders of the Sentinel Mentors, Daryl Carter and Scott Terry, are planning to chaperone. Sentinel Mentors is a black youth mentoring initiative based in Racine.

Those planning to take part in the tour are required to attend at least two parent-student meetings on the topic. There are six meetings set, with the first happening from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13, at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center, 1134 Dr. Martin Luther King Drive. Parents and students with questions can contact Carter at 262-752-7403 or Alvin Owens at 773-517-6568 or education_youth@yahoo.com.

“I had the opportunity to attend last year’s tour as a last minute chaperone fill in,” Carter said, “and besides the birth of my children and watching them perform on the football field this tour sits right up there with one of the best experiences of my life.”

Last year, Carter was disappointed that only a handful of Racine students, out of around 160 kids total, took part in the tour, which draws students from southeastern Wisconsin and Chicago.

“It is an experience that I will never forget and I would love as many children in Racine as possible to also participate in that experience,” Carter said.

Destiny Klinkhammer, a 16-year-old Case High School junior, was one of the few Racine students on the tour last year.

“It opened my eyes to the opportunities out there,” she said.

She most enjoyed seeing the architecture at Duke University in North Carolina, a private university that draws people of all ethnicities.

Klinkhammer said it was interesting to visit historically black schools because of the diversity of people there and said those at the schools were welcoming to people of all races.

She recommends that students go on the tour, even if they’re not sure about college.

Traykiese Gillentine, a junior at Saint Catherine’s High School, also went on last year’s tour.

When he came back from the tour, he brought back leadership and conflict-solving skills. He also learned about the variation between engineering programs from school to school.

Like Klinkhammer, Gillentine enjoyed visiting Duke University.

“It had the most beautiful scenery,” he said.

But the stop that stuck out most in his mind was at Morehouse College in Atlanta.

“It felt like home,” he said.

He said it felt good to be in such a welcoming atmosphere with other African Americans.

“I had a feeling as soon as I stepped on campus of security and safety,” he said.

This year’s tour

The Wisconsin/Illinois HBCU tour was established in 1998. This year’s tour is set for April 20-27, 2019.

Although the itinerary is subject to change local student on the tour can expect to head to Morehouse College, Alabama State University, Tuskegee University and Loyola University. Additional activities on the tour could include sightseeing in New Orleans and Washington D.C. and a fraternity/sorority step show.

The full cost of the trip is $600, which pays for lodging, food and transportation. The full cost must be paid by January 19. A minimum down payment of $100 is required to reserve student participation.

Fundraising opportunities are available.

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Reporter

Caitlin Sievers covers cops, crime and the west-end communities. She's a lover of cats, dance and Harry Potter. Before moving to the Racine area she worked at small papers in Indiana, Illinois and Nebraska.

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