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RACINE — A Racine woman is suing the City of Racine and a Racine police officer over injuries she claims to have sustained after being arrested in September 2017.

A complaint claims that Masharaya Lakeesha Bostick, 26, was injured “due to the negligence of the Racine Police Department” after being arrested on Sept. 7, 2017.

Last week, the Finance and Personnel Committee approved having the City Attorney’s Office defend the city, the Police Department and the involved officer in the lawsuit.

The extent and nature of the reported injuries were not explained in the complaint, although Bostick’s insurer has requested the city pay $418.59, in addition to “any other medical payments made, or to be made, as well as interest” plus attorney’s fees.

What reportedly happened

Bostick was arrested by several Racine Police officers on Sept. 7, 2017, after she allegedly was found to have smoked marijuana inside a vehicle, according to a criminal complaint. Crack cocaine and other drug paraphernalia were allegedly found in the vehicle’s trunk after officers searched it.

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She and another man were charged in the incident, although charges were dropped in October 2017.

According to the complaint filed against the city on June 4, Bostick “sustained multiple injuries, suffered great pain of body and mind, incurred medical and hospital expenses and lost wages.”

The complaint claims that a Racine officer “was careless and negligent by failing to maintain proper management and control of the vehicle, operating the vehicle in an inattentive manner, and leaving the plaintiff (Bostick) unattended in a moving vehicle” outside the Police Department, 730 Center St.

A claim for damages was sent to the city on Jan. 11, but the claim was “disallowed and denied” on May 7. The following month, Bostick’s insurer — Comp-Care Health Services Insurance Corporation/Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield — retained a private attorney and has since moved to have a jury trial.

Defense for the city and the officer involved will be provided in-house via the City Attorney’s Office, thus allowing the city to avoid “additional cost of defense” in the case, according to the city.

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Reporter

Before the JT hired him, Adam went to St. Cat's before going to Drake University. He covers homelessness and Caledonia, helps lead social media efforts, believes in the Oxford comma, and loves digital subscribers: journaltimes.com/subscribenow

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