KENOSHA — The Carthage Concert Band, Percussion Ensemble and Wind Orchestra will collaborate in a program called “Mechanical Musical Mayhem!” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 18, in A.F. Siebert Chapel at Carthage, 2001 Alford Park Drive.

Music to be performed includes several “mechanical” pieces, emulating automobile factories, atomic particle accelerators, steel mills and the fictional combination of steam-powered gadgets in the “Steampunk” genre. The oddest assortment of “instruments” are used in Mason Bates’ work written for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Chicago 2012. This selection incorporates recorded sounds from the Fermilab in Batavia, Ill., and mixes them with the sounds of the band to create an electro-acoustic mix. In addition, there are solo parts written for truck parts such as the bumper, tailgate, wheel, starter crank and suspension spring that contrast the electronic sounds with mechanical machinery. All of these are set to a funk-rock blues groove in homage to the city of its title.

Both Carthage bands are under the direction of James Ripley. However, two student conductors will also take the podium during the Concert Band portion of the concert. Emily Armbrecht, a junior from Itasca, Ill., will conduct John Mackey’s “Foundry” and Dana Wilson’s “Shubaduba” — a commissioned work by Carthage with other bands from around the U.S. Aaron Motley, a junior from Grosse Pointe, Mich., will lead Steve Bryant’s “The Machine Awakes.”

“Charlie and the Mechanical Man Marching Band,” a piece referencing the steampunk tradition, transports Victorian-era composers Charles (Charlie) Ives and John Philip Sousa to the 21st century in a machine that barely makes the journey.

Members of the Percussion Ensemble will perform Henry Brant’s “Double Crank Organ Music,” a clanky and humorous parody of a ragtime hurdy-gurdy.

Rounding out the program will be two major works of the twentieth-century, Ravel’s “Le Tombeau de Couperin” and Ingolf Dahl’s “Sinfonietta.” These selections by the Wind Orchestra incorporate highly colorful and intricate percussion scoring.

There is no admission fee.

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