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AP
Falco, Perrette, Chuck Lorre sitcom set for new CBS season

NEW YORK — Broadcaster CBS is pushing the boundaries — gently — next season, as it and other networks navigate the rise of streaming. A change-of pace sitcom from “The Big Bang Theory” creator Chuck Lorre and a drama starring Edie Falco of “The Sopranos” glory will join a lineup that also brings former CBS stars back into the fold.

Among the comeback kids is Billy Gardell, who played opposite Melissa McCarthy in CBS’ “Mike & Molly” and stars this fall in Lorre’s “Bob Hearts Abishola.” Gardell plays a Detroit compression sock salesman who falls for his Nigerian-born cardiac nurse. His co-star is Nigerian actress Folake Olowofoyeku, whose credits include “Transparent.”

CBS Corp. executive David Nevins described the sitcom as “a different flavor” for Lorre but true to his brand, which includes CBS’ “Mom” as well “The Big Bang Theory,” which departs Thursday after 12 seasons.

“Bob Hearts Abishola” is about “two adults in middle-age who are sort of unexpected,” Nevins said, and resonates with what he called “Norman Lear-ish themes,” a reference to the groundbreaking producer of “All in the Family.”

“When it comes to finding new voices, CBS will take a chance on anyone who is already on CBS,” the network’s late-night host Stephen Colbert joked in a brief set for ad buyers who gathered Wednesday for a presentation of the 2019-20 schedule.

“As you can see, despite Lindsey Graham’s advice, I honored my subpoena to be here today,” he said, throwing one of the political barbs that are a regular feature of his top-rated “Late Show.”

Other familiar CBS faces: Pauley Perrette, a former “NCIS” fan favorite, goes for laughs in the midseason sitcom “Broke”; Patricia Heaton (“Everybody Loves Raymond”) stars as a late-blooming medical intern in the comedy “Carol’s Second Act,” and Marg Helgenberger (“CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”) is part of the courthouse drama “All Rise.”

The latter two are fall entries, along with “The Unicorn,” a comedy about a widower (Walton Goggins) who’s stepping gingerly into dating.

Falco, who played a mobster’s wife in “The Sopranos” and a drug addict in “Nurse Jackie,” shifts gears in midseason’s “Tommy,” playing a former NYPD officer who becomes the first female police chief in Los Angeles.

Household name producers

Lorre isn’t the only high-profile producer contributing to CBS’ lineup next season.

Fall drama “Evil” is from Michelle and Robert King, the husband-and-wife team behind former CBS hit “The Good Wife” and the CBS All Access series “The Good Fight.” The psychological mystery examines the root of evil “along the dividing line between science and religion,” the network said.

Producer Dick Wolf, who supplies a veritable warehouse of shows to NBC with his “Chicago” franchise and “Law & Order: SVU,” could be trying for the same at CBS. He’s following up the drama “FBI” with midseason’s “FBI: Most Wanted,” with stars including Alana De La Garza and Keisha Castle-Hughes.

Say goodbye

Not every revival sticks the landing. “Murphy Brown” with Candice Bergen was one season and done, and joining canceled series that include “Happy Together,” ‘’Fam” and “Life in Pieces.”

It remains to be seen whether the end of “Murphy,” a hit for CBS back in the ‘80s and ‘90s, puts a damper on the revival-reboot trend. Among its successes are “Will & Grace” and “The Conners,” salvaged from the “Roseanne” reboot put into jeopardy by its namesake star’s racist tweet.


Entertainment
AP
Without Perry, '90210' cast preps reboot

NEW YORK — At an event promoting the upcoming slate of Fox shows, the cast of the “Beverly Hills, 90210” reboot remembered their castmate Luke Perry, who died earlier this year.

“Luke was a huge part of our ‘90210’ family, and personally Luke was a very large part of my life,” Jason Priestly said. “So, it’s obviously very difficult to do this without him.”

Entitled “BH90210,” the new show isn’t a continuation of the series. Having gone their separate ways after the series ended nearly 20 years ago, the actors return as heightened versions of themselves.

In addition to Priestley, original stars Jennie Garth, Ian Ziering, Gabrielle Carteris, Brian Austin Green and Tori Spelling were in New York to promote the new show, set for a summer debut.

“The show is comedic drama, very, very heavy on the comedy side. It’s a scripted, fake reality show that follows Jason Priestly and Ian Ziering and Jennie Garth, all of us trying to get a reboot of ‘Beverly Hills 90210’ made, and what that entails,” Priestley said.

“Very much like ‘Episodes.’ A little bit of ‘Arrested Development’ thrown in there. A little bit of ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ thrown in there. But very much in the vein of those shows.”

While most of the original cast will return, there is a void after the passing of Perry in March. Ziering said he’s still processing his grief.

“I’m still having trouble reconciling that, so I don’t have an answer for you. It’s difficult. He was a good friend of mine,” he said.

Garth added: “He’s been with us every step of the way.”


Listing
AP
Today in History

Today’s Highlight:

On May 16, 1966, China launched the Cultural Revolution, a radical as well as deadly reform movement aimed at purging the country of “counter-revolutionaries.”

On this date:

In 1868, at the U.S. Senate impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, 35 out of 54 senators voted to find Johnson guilty of “high crimes and misdemeanors” over his attempted dismissal of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, falling one vote short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict; the trial ended 10 days later after two other articles of impeachment went down to defeat as well.

In 1919, pianist Liberace was born in West Allis, Wisconsin.

In 1920, Joan of Arc was canonized by Pope Benedict XV.

In 1939, the federal government began its first food stamp program in Rochester, New York.

In 1943, the nearly month-long Warsaw Ghetto Uprising came to an end as German forces crushed the Jewish resistance and blew up the Great Synagogue.

In 1953, Associated Press correspondent William N. Oatis was released by Communist authorities in Czechoslovakia, where he had been imprisoned for two years after being forced to confess to espionage while working as the AP’s Prague bureau chief.

In 1975, Japanese climber Junko Tabei became the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest.

In 1988, the U.S. Supreme Court, in California v. Greenwood, ruled that police could search discarded garbage without a search warrant. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop released a report declaring nicotine was addictive in ways similar to heroin and cocaine.

In 1991, Queen Elizabeth II became the first British monarch to address the United States Congress as she lauded U.S.-British cooperation in the Persian Gulf War.

In 1997, President Bill Clinton publicly apologized for the notorious Tuskegee experiment, in which government scientists deliberately allowed black men to weaken and die of treatable syphilis.

In 2007, anti-war Democrats in the Senate failed in an attempt to cut off funds for the Iraq war.

Ten years ago: The ruling Congress party swept to a resounding victory in India’s mammoth national elections.

Five years ago: Federal safety regulators slapped General Motors with a record $35 million fine for taking more than a decade to disclose an ignition-switch defect in millions of cars linked at that point to at least 13 deaths (the figure later rose to 90).

One year ago: Officials at Michigan State University said they had agreed to pay $500 million to settle claims from more than 300 women and girls who said they were assaulted by sports doctor Larry Nassar.

Thought for Today: “The enemy of the conventional wisdom is not ideas but the march of events.” — John Kenneth Galbraith, American economist, diplomat and author (1908-2006).


Associated Press 

Queen Elizabeth II waves from the steps of the United States Senate on May 16, 1991, in Washington on her way to address a joint session of Congress. House Speaker Thomas Foley, left, and Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell escort the Queen. 


National
AP
Birthdays – May 16

Actor Danny Trejo is 75. Actor Pierce Brosnan is 66. Actress Debra Winger is 64. Actress Mare Winningham is 60. Bassist Krist Novoselic (Nirvana) is 54. Singer Janet Jackson is 53. Actor-singer Scott Reeves (“Nashville,” ‘’General Hospital”) is 53. Actor David Boreanaz (“Bones,” ‘’Buffy the Vampire Slayer”) is 50. Political correspondent Tucker Carlson is 50. Actress Tracey Gold (“Growing Pains”) is 50. Actor Khary Payton (“The Walking Dead”) is 47. Rapper Special Ed is 47. Actress Tori Spelling is 46. Rapper B. Slade (A.K.A. Tonex) is 44. Actress Melanie Lynskey (“Two and a Half Men”) is 42. Actor Joseph Morgan (“The Originals,” ‘’Vampire Diaries”) is 38. Actress Megan Fox (“Transformers”) is 33. Actor Drew Roy (“Falling Skies,” ‘’Hannah Montana”) is 33. Actor Thomas Brodie-Sangster (“Game of Thrones”) is 29. Actor Marc John Jefferies (“The Tracy Morgan Show”) is 29. Actor Miles Heizer (“13 Reasons Why,” ‘’Parenthood”) is 25.