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    Thousands of U.K. train drivers have walked off the job in a 24-hour strike over jobs, pay and conditions, scuppering services across much of the country. The walkout is the latest in a spreading series of strikes by British workers seeking substantial raises to offset soaring prices for food and fuel. Weekend workers, soccer fans heading for games and families heading for the seaside are among those having to change their plans on Saturday. Railway staff held a series of one-day strikes in June and July and plan more walkouts next week. Postal workers, lawyers, British Telecom staff, dock workers and garbage collectors have all announced walkouts for later this month.

    Italy’s worst drought in decades has reduced the country’s largest lake to near its lowest level ever recorded. Tourists flocking to Lake Garda on Friday for the start of a long weekend found a vastly different landscape than in past years. An expansive stretch of bleached rock extended far from the normal shoreline. Northern Italy hasn’t seen significant rainfall for months, and snowfall this year was down 70%. With rivers that farmers use to irrigate crops drying up, authorities allowed more water from Lake Garda to flow out to local waterways. The lake’s temperature, meanwhile, has been above average for August and on Friday approached the average for the Caribbean Sea.

    Dutch financial prosecutors say they have detained a man suspected of involvement in “concealing criminal financial flows and facilitating money laundering” through the virtual currency mixer Tornado Cash. The financial prosecution service FIOD said in a statement released Friday that the 29-year-old man was arrested Aug. 10 in Amsterdam. The suspect’s identity was not released, in line with Dutch privacy regulations. Mixing services combine various digital assets, including potentially illegally obtained funds and legitimately obtained funds, so the holders of illegally obtained assets can obscure the origin of stolen funds.

    Sen. Kyrsten Sinema received a $1 million surge of campaign cash over the past year from private equity professionals, hedge fund managers and venture capitalists whose interests she has staunchly defended in Congress. That's according to an Associated Press review of campaign finance disclosures. The revelation comes after the Arizona Democrat single-handedly thwarted her party's long-standing goal of raising taxes on such investors. Sinema says the contributions did not influence her thinking on the matter. But many in her party see Sinema's defense of the favorable tax treatment received by such investors as indefensible.

    The flagship climate change and health care bill passed by Democrats and soon to be signed by President Joe Biden will bring U.S. taxpayers one step closer to a government-operated electronic free-file tax return system. It’s something lawmakers and advocates have been seeking for years. For many Americans, it’s frustrating that beyond having to pay sometimes hefty tax bills, they also have to shell out additional money for tax preparation programs or preparers because of an increasingly complex U.S. tax system. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says, “It’s definitely something we should do, and when the IRS is adequately resourced, it’s something that will happen."

    A pipeline carrying diesel has cracked open and spilled more than 45,000 gallons of fuel in a rural area of eastern Wyoming. The ruptured line is owned by a company that is being sued by federal prosecutors over previous spills in North Dakota and Montana. Joe Hunter with Wyoming's Department of Environmental Quality says that cleanup work is ongoing from the spill that was discovered July 27 on private ranch land near the small community of Sussex. The line is operated by Bridger Pipeline, a subsidiary of Casper, Wyoming-based True companies. Federal prosecutors have alleged in a pending federal court case that previous spills on the companies' lines violated environmental laws.

    The biggest investment ever in the U.S. to fight climate change. A hard-fought cap on out-of-pocket prescription drug costs for people in the Medicare program. A new corporate minimum tax to ensure big businesses pay their share. And billions leftover to pay down federal deficits. All told, the Democrats’ “Inflation Reduction Act” may not do much to immediately tame inflationary price hikes. But the package approved by Congress and headed to the White House for President Joe Biden’s signature will touch countless American lives with longtime party proposals. Here's a look at what's in the estimated $740 billion economic package.

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    Content by Brand Ave. Studios. The annual Amazon Prime Day is coming July 12 and 13, and per usual will offer discounts on many of your favorite things.

    Content by Brand Ave. Studios. The annual Amazon Prime Day is coming July 12 and 13, and per usual will offer discounts on many of your favorite things.

    Democrats have pushed their landmark climate and health care bill through Congress, handing an election-year victory to President Joe Biden. The House approved the bill over solid Republican opposition Friday, five days after the Senate did the same. The vote means a win for Biden that until late July seemed out of reach. The package is much smaller than Biden's original environment and social legislation that failed in Congress last year. But after long, bitter talks, Democrats agreed to a smaller but still substantive compromise. It includes Washington's biggest ever effort on climate change, pharmaceutical price curbs and tax boosts on big corporations, long-held party goals.

    With inflation raging near its highest level in four decades, the House gave final approval to President Joe Biden’s landmark Inflation Reduction Act. Its title raises a tantalizing question: Will the measure actually do what it says? Economic analyses suggest that the answer is likely no — not anytime soon, anyway. The legislation, which now heads to the White House for Biden's signature, won’t directly address some of the main drivers of surging prices — from gas and food to rents and restaurant meals. Still, over time, the bill could save money for some Americans by lessening the cost of certain prescription drugs for the elderly, extending health insurance subsidies and reducing energy prices.

    Officials say St. Charles Health System in Central Oregon accidentally overpaid thousands of employees a total of $2 million and is demanding employees pay that money back. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports employees were told Thursday of the total amounts allegedly owed. Scott Palmer of the Oregon Nurses Association said the amounts range from less than $100 to as much as $3,000. More than 2,300 employees apparently owe some money to St. Charles. The pay issues stem from a ransomware attack on Ultimate Kronos Group, a technology company that runs St. Charles’ payroll system. Scott Palmer of the Oregon Nurses Association said their members have received little evidence that the hospital system overpaid employees.

    Newspaper publisher Gannett Co. confirmed Friday that it’s laying off some of its newsroom staff as part of a cost-cutting effort to lower its expenses as its revenue crumbles amid a downturn in ad sales and customer subscriptions. The McLean, Virginia-based company declined to provide details about the number of people who were losing their jobs. Gannett, which owns USA Today and more than 200 other daily U.S. newspapers with print editions, ended last year with more than 16,000 employees worldwide, according to the company's annual report. The payroll included including more than 4,200 reporters, editors and photographers.

    Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street, giving the S&P 500 its first 4-week winning streak since November. The benchmark index gained 1.7% Friday, and other indexes also rose. Technology stocks drove much the broad rally. Inflation cooled more than expected last month, sending stocks higher. Investors see a greater chance inflation may have peaked, allowing the Federal Reserve to be less aggressive with its rate hikes than it has been this year. Crude oil prices fell, while bond yields were mixed.

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