Details for Consumer Confidence Report

2018 Consumer Confidence Report Data
KENOSHA WATER UTILITY, PWS ID: 23000461
Este informe contiene información importante acerca de su agua potable. Haga que alguien lo traduzca para usted, o hable con alguien que lo entienda.
When you drink Kenosha tap water, you’re drinking clean, high quality water. Kenosha’s drinking water meets or exceeds all state and federal water quality
standards. The Kenosha Water Utility’s state certified laboratory tests Kenosha’s drinking water more than 10,000 times per year. The drinking water quality
information in this report covers the period of January 2018 to December 2018.
Water System Information - If you would like to know more about the information in this report, please contact Ian Bagley at (262) 653-4330.
Opportunity for input on decisions affecting your water quality - The Kenosha Water Utility Board of Water Commissioners meets on the second and last
Monday of each month at 5:30 PM in Room 202 of the Municipal Building, 625 52nd St., Kenosha, Wisconsin. Meeting dates and times are subject to change.
Please call the Kenosha Water Utility at (262) 653-4308 to confirm.
Health Information
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants
does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the
Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791).
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised individuals such as persons with
cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune systems disorders, some elderly,
and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. The EPA and the
Center for Disease Control’s guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available
from the EPA’s safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791).
Sources of Water
The Kenosha Water Utility has three active sources of water, all of which are in Lake Michigan. There are two intakes at a depth of about 35 feet; the third intake
is at a depth of five feet. To obtain a summary of the source water assessment please contact Ian Bagley at (262) 653-4330.
Educational Information
The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over
the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances
resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
• Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations
and wildlife.
• Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic
wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
• Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff and residential uses.
• Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum
production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff and septic systems.
• Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water
systems. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which shall provide the same protection for public health.
Definitions
Term
Definition
AL

Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must
follow.

MCL

Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as
feasible using the best available treatment technology.

MCLG

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.
MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

N/A

Not Applicable

ND

Not Detected

NTU

Nephelometric Turbidity Units: A measure of cloudiness

pCi/I

Picocurries per liter

ppm

parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/L)

ppb

parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (μg/L)

TCR

Total Coliform Rule

TT

Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce to reduce the level of a contaminant in drink water.

Detected Contaminants
Your drinking water was tested for many contaminants last year. We are allowed to monitor for some contaminants less frequently than once a year. The
following tables list only those contaminants that were detected in your water. If a contaminant was detected within the last 5 years, it will appear in the tables
below along with the sample date.
Microbiological Contaminants
Contaminant

MCL

COLIFORM (TCR)

MCLG

Count of Positives

Violation

0

0%

No

Presence of coliform bacteria in
5% of monthly samples

Typical Source of Contaminant
Naturally present in the environment

Disinfection By products
Contaminant
(units)

Site

MCL

MCLG

HAA5 (ppb)

17

60

60

TTHM (ppb)

17

80

0

HAA5 (ppb)

29

60

60

TTHM (ppb)

29

80

HAA5 (ppb)

52

TTHM (ppb)

Avg Level
Found

Range

Sample
Date

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

15

9-14

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

28.9

13.1-40.7

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

17

10-18

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

0

41.7

24.2-49.8

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

60

60

12

8-14

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

52

80

0

27.1

12-35.8

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

HAA5 (ppb)

7

60

60

14

10-14

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

TTHM (ppb)

7

80

0

30.9

14.9-38.1

2018

No

By-product of drinking water chlorination

Inorganic Contaminants
MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date

Violation

ANTIMONY (ppb)

Contaminant (units)

6

6

0.21

Single
Result

2017

No

Discharge from petroleum refineries, fire
retardants, ceramics, electronics, solder

Typical Source of Contaminant

ARSENIC (ppb)

10

0

0.66

Single
Result

2017

No

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards;
runoff from glass and electronics production
wastes

BARIUM (ppm)

2

2

0.021

Single
Result

2017

No

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal
refineries; erosion of natural deposits

FLUORIDE (ppm)

4

4

0.74 (avg)

0.63-0.82

2018

No

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which
promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer
and aluminum factories

NICKEL (ppb)

100

N/A

0.90

Single
Result

2017

No

Occurs naturally in soils, ground water and surface
waters and is often used in electroplating, stainless
steel and alloy products.

NITRATE as N (ppm)

10

10

0.48

Single
Result

2018

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic
tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

SODIUM (ppm)

N/A

N/A

9.40

Single
Result

2018

No

N/A

Regulated contaminants tested for but not detected in our system: berylium, cadmium, cyanide, mercury, selenium & thallium (Sample Date 2017).
Lead and Copper
Contaminant
(units)

Action
Level

MCLG

90th Percentile
Level Found

# of Results

Sample
Date

Violation

Typical Source of Contaminant

COPPER (ppm)

AL=1.3

1.3

0.1100

0 of 30 results
were above the
action level.

2017

No

Corrosion of household plumbing
systems; erosion of natural deposits;
leaching from wood preservatives

LEAD (ppb)

AL=15

0

8.90

2 of 30 results
were above the
action level.

2017

No

Corrosion of household plumbing
systems; erosion of natural deposits

Radioactive Contaminants
Contaminant (units)

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

Sample Date

Violation

5

0

1.5

1.5

2014

No

RADIUM, (226 + 228) (pCi/l)

Typical Source of Contaminant
Erosion of natural deposits

Turbidity Monitoring
In accordance with s. NR 810.29, Wisconsin Administrative Code, the treated surface water is monitored for turbidity to confirm that the filtered water is less
than 0.1 NTU/0.3 NTU. Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water. We monitor for it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration
system. During the year, the highest single entry point turbidity measurement was 0.048 NTU. The lowest monthly percentage of samples meeting the
turbidity limits was 100 percent. (Zero turbidity samples exceeded the turbidity limits in 2018.)
Contaminant (units)
TURBIDITY (NTU)

MCL

MCLG

Avg Level Found

Range

Sample Date

Violation

0.30

N/A

0.030 (avg)

0.024-0.048

2018

No

Typical Source of Contaminant
Runoff from soil

Unregulated Contaminants
Unregulated contaminants are those for which the EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant
monitoring is to assist the EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is
warranted. The EPA required us to participate in this monitoring.
Max Level Found

Range

Sample Date

SULFATE (ppm)

Contaminant (units)

28.00

25.00 - 28.00

2017

BROMIDE (ppb)

36

34 - 36

2018

BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID (ppb)

3.7

1.7 - 3.7

2018

BROMODICHLOROACETIC ACID (ppb)

5.5

3.5 - 5.5

2018

CHLORODIBROMOACETIC ACID (ppb)

1.10

0.96 - 1.10

2018

CHROMIUM 6 (ppb)

0.247

0.190 - 0.247

2014

CHROMIUM Total (ppb)

1.220

0.241 - 1.220

2014

DIBROMOACETIC ACID (ppb)

0.93

0.40 - 0.93

2018

DICHLOROACETIC ACID (ppb)

7.2

3.0 - 7.2

2018

1.1873

ND – 1.1873

2014

MONOBROMOACETIC ACID (ppb)

0.63

ND - 0.63

2018

TRICHLOROACETIC ACID (ppb)

8.4

4.0 - 8.4

2018

127.365

117.625 – 127.365

2014

1.9

1.8 - 1.9

2018

MOLYBDENUM (ppb)

STRONTIUM (ppb)
TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (ppm)

VANADIUM (ppb)
0.318
0.2407 – 0.318
2014
Unregulated contaminants tested for in 2018 but not detected in our system: germanium, manganese, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, 1
pesticide byproduct, 8 pesticides, 10 cyanotoxins, 3 alcohols, and 3 semi-volatile organic compounds.
Health Effects for Contaminants with MCL Violations/Action Level Exceedances
Contaminant
Health Effects
LEAD

Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or
mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water
over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure.

Additional Health Information
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is
primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Kenosha Water Utility is responsible for providing high
quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you
can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for thirty seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are
concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods and steps you can take
to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Information on Monitoring for Radon and Cryptosporidium
Our water system did not monitor our water for radon during 2018. We were not required by state or federal drinking water regulations to do so.
Our water system began a two-year Cryptosporidium monitoring program in October 2015, in accordance with the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule requirements. No oocysts* were found in any of the 24 monthly samples (October 2015 to September 2017).
*oocyst: A hardy, thick-walled stage of the life cycle of certain parasites. This is the stage that serves to transfer them to new hosts.

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