Gisele Bundchen, the supermodel whose husband is New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, found their three pre-teen children visibly upset by the Patriots’ 41-33 upset loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl LII on Sunday in Minneapolis. In her effort to console the kids, USA Today reported, she told them: “They (the Eagles) never won before. Their whole life, they never won a Super Bowl. You have to let someone else win sometimes.” Hmmmm. Let someone else win? We wonder how Mr. Brady feels about the idea that he “let” the Eagles win.

Bundchen was complimentary to Eagles players she encountered on her way out of the stadium, which is an improvement from the last time the Patriots lost the big game. When the Brady-led Patriots lost a second Super Bowl to the New York Giants on Feb. 5, 2012, Bundchen was caught on video afterward responding to heckling Giants fans in this manner: “You (have) to catch the ball when you’re supposed to catch the ball. My husband cannot (expletive deleted) throw the ball and catch the ball at the same time. I can’t believe they dropped the ball so many times.” Oooh … there’s no “I” in team, Ms. Bundchen. Although Brady, who threw for an eye-popping 505 yards and three touchdowns in Sunday’s loss to the Eagles, did sort of prove that he “cannot … catch the ball” when New England ran a play in which a pass was thrown to Brady and he couldn’t get his hands on it. As quarterbacks sent out on pass patterns go, Tom Brady is no Nick Foles. (Foles, the Eagles’ quarterback, caught a pass for a touchdown a few plays after Brady failed to make the reception.)

Pay for performance: The UW Board of Regents was scheduled to meet Thursday and today, and among the items under consideration was giving raises to Badgers football team head coach Paul Chryst (scheduled to make $3.3 million in 2018), offensive coordinator Joe Rudolph ($650,000) and defensive coordinator Jim Leonhard ($600,000). Considering that the Badgers finished the regular season 12-0, and rebounded from a loss to Ohio State in the Big Ten championship game with an Orange Bowl win over the Miami Hurricanes, we think the Badgers’ top three coaches have earned raise consideration, especially since Leonhard’s work with the UW defense has reportedly made other schools interested in spiriting him away from Camp Randall to coach for them. But another compensation item on the Regents’ agenda has us throwing a penalty flag, or more appropriately whistling for a foul: Women’s basketball coach Jonathan Tsipis, whom the Wisconsin State Journal reports is making $625,000 in his second season leading the UW women’s basketball team and was scheduled for a $25,000 raise next year.

His team began the week 9-16 overall and 2-10 in the Big Ten this season after going 9-22 and 3-13 in 2016-17. This guy deserves a raise? When his teams start performing more like those of Geno Auriemma at UConn or the late, great Pat Summitt at Tennessee — or if the Badgers under Tsipis have even one season like Muffett McGraw at Notre Dame, whose Fighting Irish are well on their way to an eighth consecutive 30-win campaign — then the Regents can talk about a bump in Coach Tsipis’ pay grade. Raises are for exceptional performance.

No slipping on this banana peel: Gros Michel — “Fat Michael” in French — was the king of all bananas in the 1950s, with a taste some have likened to artificial banana flavor — but the Michel breed was almost completely wiped out by a fungus called Panama disease in the 1960s, National Public Radio reported Wednesday. Panama disease didn’t affect Cavendish bananas, so commercial farmers replanted, and that’s the breed of banana most of us find at the grocery store. A Japanese farmer, Setsuzo Tanaka, wanted to bring back the richer, sweeter Gros Michel, and he wanted to grow it pesticide-free. In some ways, that was the trickiest part of his project: While Gros Michel bananas are still around on some farms, they’re just as susceptible to fungus as ever. But in the process, Mr. Tanaka has this winter developed an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. He calls it the Mongee, which means “incredible banana” in Japanese. We have two thoughts: We want to try this banana today, and how much different would the cartoons of our youth have been if all the banana peels had been consumed, rather than tossed on the floor for someone else’s pratfall?

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