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Stop sign

A stop sign is shown at the intersection of Goold Street and Carlisle Avenue. The fact that the intersection is a four-way stop has drawn complaints from some residents. 

STEPHANIE JONES, stephanie.jones@journaltimes.com

RACINE — Stop signs at a north side intersection have drawn a lot of controversy. The mayor even stepped in.

The City Council earlier this month voted down a recommendation to remove a four-way stop control at the intersection of Goold Street and Carlisle Avenue. Installation of the four-way stop was approved last fall, according to city records. But the city’s Traffic Commission later recommended removing that control and re-installing a two-way stop, with the signs facing Carlisle Avenue.

The request was brought forward by Racine County Board Supervisor Melissa Kaprelian-Becker. She told city officials that her constituents have complained that the all-way stop is unnecessary, according to minutes from the Traffic Commission’s meeting.

After more than an hour of discussion at its May 1 meeting, the City Council disagreed with the committee’s request; only 1st District Alderman Jeff Coe and 4th District Alderman Tracey Larrin supported the move, meeting minutes show. The council then took further action on the subject, voting 13 to 2 in favor of directing city staff to bring forward “a better, safer solution at this intersection.” Racine Mayor Cory Mason vetoed that request.

Mason said he wanted to offer a sense of security to the residents near the intersection, who expressed concerns about safety for children. He said he didn’t want them to feel like the matter remained in flux.

“I think it’s really important for those neighborhood residents, over by Carlisle and Goold, to have certainty that their kids are going to be able to be safe in that neighborhood,” Mason said.

Whether a four-way stop was the best way to ensure safety in that location was a point of contention among aldermen when they addressed the issue earlier this month. Some argued that data presented by city staff did not support the need for the four-way stop. Others argued that the information did not reflect anecdotal experiences people had but didn’t report to the city.

City Council President Jason Meekma, who represents the 14th District, requested that the council consider overriding Mason’s veto because he said he thought the staff study was a good compromise between those in favor and opposed to the stop signs. The veto was sustained Tuesday after the request to override failed by a vote of 6 to 8.

“I think it’s really important for those neighborhood residents, over by Carlisle and Goold, to have certainty that their kids are going to be able to be safe in that neighborhood.” Racine Mayor Cory Mason
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Reporter

Sari Lesk covers the City of Racine, Gateway and UW-Parkside. She is new to the community and moonlights as an amateur baker.

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